07/08/2016Man Ray’s Revolving Doors

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Yesterday I went to one of my favourite galleries, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, to see the Surreal Encounters | Collecting the Marvellous exhibition. It included many visual and conceptual delights, one of them being Man Ray’s Revolving Doors series – wonderful colours and compositions of geometric shapes to inspire.

From Princeton University Art Museum website:
Between 1916 and 1917, the artist and photographer Man Ray created a series of collages he called “Revolving Doors.” He included the series in his third solo exhibition at the Daniel Gallery in New York, in 1919. The collages, whose geometric shapes combine machine-like and anthropomorphic forms, were framed and installed on a rotating pole that the viewer could spin. The original collages were destroyed, but Ray later reproduced them in this series of stencil prints, published by Éditions Surréalistes in Paris.

The Revolving Doors: The concern of a period of time often leads to the disappearance of material space. That is what the images in two dimensions shown here tend to prove; by a mutual action, they give birth to a series of events escaping from the control of all diversion.

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01/04/2016Evelin Kasikov’s CMYK embroidery


Evelin Kasikov is a graphic designer specialising in print and editorial design in London. She has developed ‘CMYK embroidery’, an original handmade printing technique. Her approach to craft is analytical and firmly rooted in her graphic design background. She uses typography, grid systems and design techniques to challenge the preconceptions of embroidery.

More from her website:
CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black) is a colour system that is based on the four colours used in traditional offset printing. CMYK embroidery is a hand-made printing process that I developed during my MA studies at Central St Martins 2006–2008. The idea of handmade print started as an academic project. Now, most of my work is based on that.
I use conventional screen angles: Cyan 105˚, Magenta 75˚, Yellow 90˚ and Black 45˚ and prepare dot screens for cross-stitch. Works are stitched using cotton threads in CMYK colours, the intensity of colour depends on the number of strands used. The final outcome is a printed page created by hand.


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11/11/2015Made in Italy

‘Made in Italy’ is an exhibition of post-war Italian graphic design created by SEA Design and Fedrigoni, showcased for one night only on the 4th of November at Edinburgh’s Fruitmarket Gallery. It featured posters from some famous names such as Massimo Vignelli, Franco Grignani and Bob Noorda, as well as less well-known designers outside of Italy.

A small crowed of graphic designers gathered at the gallery to have a drink, feast their eyes and go home with their bag of give-away goodies – a lovely evening all round!

made-in0italy-posters

Original poster by Heinz Waibl, Lambretta Club poster (1959) reproduced in four colour variations for the exhibition

SEA booklets

Booklets design by SEA Design, printed on various paper stock, each featuring a designer (Franco Grignani, Giancarlo Iliprandi, Heinz Waibl, Ilio Negri) and bound together in a box.

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Heinz Waibl

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Heinz Waibl

Giancarlo Iliprandi

Giancarlo Iliprandi

Franco Grignani spread

Franco Grignani

Franco Grignani poster

Franco Grignani

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01/07/2015& a cherry on top!

ampersand
I designed this poster as part of an alphabet poster series, created by 28 Emperor employees in a fund raising effort for The Royal Marsden Cancer Charity.

Now my 5 years old daughter knows what an Ampersand is…

 

 

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29/05/2015Futuristic men, a baby and a toddler


Years ago, way back in 1998 when I just moved to Amsterdam, I used to receive post for the previous tenants who seemed to know everyone there was to know in the local art scene (or so it seemed to us newcomers). Among others, they received invitations for events in HEDAH, a centre for contemporary art in Maastricht.
I collected them at the time, and just found them again recently. These invitations are so weird, and kind of freaky, but they somehow work. I wonder how the designer pitched it to the client though… futuristic men, a baby and a toddler.

HEDAH’s current website, by the way, is beyond boring. I guess whoever commissioned those invitations would have never approve them today…

The invitations do not credit the designer, and I couldn’t find any other information about it (obviously they were distributed at an ancient time when internet was hardly in use), but if anyone out there knows the name of the person who created these images, I would love to set history straight and credit him/ her here…



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